A Cruel World In The UK

At the end of my last post focusing on The Importance Of Family, it may have seemed as though I was starting to wander of topic when I was speaking about the current political and media discourse surrounding people with disabilities. I do get passionate when talking about that particular topic because when I watch the TV news or read a newspaper, it always seems to be an outsider looking in and telling us what having a disability is like, how we feel and what our aims are, based on very general, blanket surveys and statistics. That’s not to say that those opinions and statistics are unimportant but it does seem as though the use of expert opinions and statistics are being used in the wrong way; it seems to me that the current government has, grabbed the wrong end of the stick. As I say it may seems as though Im’ having a political rant but it is going somewhere, I promise.

All Good Will Is Gone

I read in a recent article that the percentage of the UK’s disabled population and lives on funding from the welfare state that wants paid work was in the sixtieth percentile (which is actually not bad when you consider that approximately half of the UK’s disabled population are OAP’s). These stats have been used as a tool to cut the welfare expenditure currently being paid by the government in order to reduce the deficit and increase the current spending budget. By using this statistic they have been able to justify cutting benefits such as the DLA (Disability Living Allowance) and introducing PIP (Personal Independence Payment, a non means tested, weekly payment based on the extent of your disability and how it affects your daily life. A payment much less in terms of the amount paid and is extremely difficult to access), cuts to Carer’s Allowance and an excessively strict screening process to become a carer, the cut to Tax Credits, Housing Allowance and so much more. All of these things contribute to people with disabilities and people living in poverty feeling ashamed of their disability and/or hating themselves for being the person they are and the life they lead.

The Power of Government & Media

“Make up your own mind, don’t let other people tell you. What we are saying is take a critical view, find out about it. Don’t believe something just because someone tells you to. If somebody says something, question it and work it out for yourself.”

– John Cleese

How they have justified these actions? The current government has stated that these cuts to the welfare state are to incentivize those people that make up the sixtieth percentile of people with disabilities that want to get paid work into actually doing it. The implication of that statement is that the disabled population of the UK have not been pulling their weight, have not been trying hard enough and that their inability to find paid work is because of their own failures and laziness, not the disability that they wake up and live with every day. The idea that people with disabilities are taking advantage of a welfare state designed and implemented to look out for their wellbeing, due to a lack of incentive, as opposed to being unable to do certain things due to their condition or disability is preposterous. Especially when certain disabilities can rule you out of most and, in some cases, all forms of employment. The accusation is that people with disabilities rely on the state to help them get by in life and that this attitude of reliance on government aid and welfare support from the disabled population is unacceptable. Isn’t that the point of a welfare state though, to look after the poor the weak and the vulnerable?

For further insight into the type of cuts and welfare reforms implemented by the coalition government since 2010 and now being expanded and hammered home by the Conservative government follow this link to statistics produced by www.unison.org.uk, the public service trade union.

When this is the narrative being produced by both politicians and certain aspects of the media, it is humiliating. The implication that the people with disabilities in the UK are a bunch of lazy, scroungers taking advantage of a system put in place to help us is terrible. When it is a dialogue being discussed by those who are in positions of power and influence it is even worse because other people hear it on TV and read it in newspapers and magazines and start to believe what they are being told. This dialogue becomes a virus and spreads to the point where a stigma attaches itself to the subject of disability. In my view, the problem is that people don’t think for themselves anymore, nobody ever questions what they are being told; they seem to just accept it as truth.

How I interpret These Changes

As a disabled person who has gone through many of the different processes in welfare, health and social care, I can only speak for myself. I think though, given the current mood of people with disabilities and of the poor and working class people in the UK that I am not alone.

These narratives I have mentioned in the above paragraphs that are being fed to the UK public are demeaning and diminish our disabilities in the eyes of the general population. The new model of welfare, health and social care is one based on doing more with less (an impossible feat by it’s very wording). Access to the services is based on a fixed model, with fixed criteria and no variation or accommodation for individual circumstance.

We are at a stage where the model is almost like this; an authority, one that hasn’t met you before, places a mark on the wall at two meters. They then state that to be eligible for the financial aid and the many programs of health & social care you need, you have to be equal to or exceed this height. Anything under that, even if you’re one meter and ninety-nine centimeters high, they say: “YOU DO NOT QUALIFY. YOU ARE NOT DISABLED TO A SATISFACTORY STANDARD THAT WE HAVE IMPOSED, YOU DON’T MEET WHAT OUR IDEA OF DISABILITY IS.” What the current UK government are essentially saying is that disabilities do not include variables such as I was born this way, or (what we are here to talk about) I had a brain hemorrhage (for example) and now I’m not good at interacting with people, I do suffer from fatigue, I can’t retain information as well as everyone else. But I can walk and talk, that’s enough for me to get a job. None of the different aspects and manifestations of different disabilities seem to matter anymore. We all have to be the same in terms of the definition of disability. Does nobody else see the flaw in this model? Am I alone here?

(Very Few) Exceptions To The Rule

When the systems implemented by the government and reinforced by narratives from the media, as a person with a disability, I can say that I have since felt lousy. Authorities have told me that I do not qualify for certain aspects of a welfare and health and social care system that we pay for as citizens of the UK with our taxes (paid by ourselves, parents, grandparents and great-grandparents, mine and yours). Instead we are told that there is not enough money in the pot and ill, vulnerable and disabled people are sent out to do their duty of a hard days graft. After all, “we’re all in this together” (accept the wealthy elite who seem to see tax as beneath them).Is this what we call a civilised, compassionate democracy?

A Conclusion: How All Of This Makes Me, A Person With A Disability, Feel

Being forced into work with a disability such as an acquired brain injury wreaks havoc with your mind. I started to question myself. I had been judged to be just as capable as everyone else, so when I realized that I obviously wasn’t, I questioned why I was doing so badly (a question with an obvious answer). But the state had said to me, “your acquired brain injury and all of the ways that injury manifests itself have been measured at only one meter and ninety-nine centimeters, not enough I’m afraid to be eligible for the welfare and services you have applied for.” The way I saw it, if the state has not judged me as disabled and ineligible for support and with all the things going wrong for me, there must be something wrong with me as a person. “Are the things people at work are saying true? Am I lazy? Am I not a team player? Am I rude, inappropriate and antisocial? Why am I getting so tired when nobody else is? I always seem to forget things, why is that?” You start to question your own ability, disability and it’s manifestations and you turn any anger and hatred that was previously aimed at the disability inwards, on yourself. You start to hate yourself and think you don’t have any value when you have been sacked from a job for another mistake or for an incident which is actually a consequence or manifestation of your ABI.

When this happens our self-confidence and how we see and value ourselves plummets. These are the type of things that carers do not get to see or feel with brain injuries and in previous posts (Only lessons and Simplifying ABI Recovery) I mentioned the dangers of not seeing the bigger picture or only seeing 1 dimension of a brain injury patient’s recovery, this is the type of thing I was talking about. Finally, when talking about the role of the family in last week’s post there was something important that I missed, seeing an ABI in all three dimensions is so important because the family are the people who can help build a patient back up when he or she continues to get knocked down in unkind world.

Thanks for reading, sorry if I droned on a little this week but I really want to emphasise some of the negative influences around at the moment as next week I will be moving onto the topic of mental health. To see more of what I am doing, follow me on Twitter (my handle is @ABIblogger) or follow my me on Instagram where my handle is abi_wordpress_massey. Thanks again and please, join the mailing list and follow me on WordPress to to raise awareness on ABI & TBI.

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