Why We Shouldn’t Simplify ABI Recovery

This post is aimed more toward family members and those living in close contact with patients recovering from ABI’s and TBI’s. It links on quite nicely from the last post Only Lessons and was not a subject I had really thought of covering while I had been planning out my blog posts and yet here we are. Last week I spoke about the slightly less tangible aspects of brain injury recovery. These are areas that in some places, even after six and a half years when I think I have seen, felt and heard it all, still throw surprises my way. So after last week I thought very hard about what it was I had said to you and tried to add another carriage to that train of thought.

Something To Remember…

Unfortunately, much of this post has a “what not to do” kind of message. I know what some people reading this will be saying, and I completely agree with you, that “it is so hard to learn the best way to approach recovery and what to do when things become uncertain and when things don’t go right and its easy for him to sit here and type away telling people how to and how not to approach a type of recovery with so many variable factors”. If that is how this post comes across, I sincerely apologise but the truth is that, after discharge, families get very little outpatient support. It cannot be just my family and I that has seen and experienced the majority of outpatient services, for ABI patients and carers alike, and believe the majority of them to be a complete joke. So the reason I am writing this particular blog post is to try and help you bypass some of the lessons our family had to learn the hard way.

What Can Happen When We Don’t Properly Analyse The Outcomes Of Challenges During ABI Recovery?

If you happened to catch last weeks post and if you have been following me on Twitter, I spoke about not seeing and defining the outcomes of challenges as either success or failure, not to see things in that narrow, one dimensional frame of mind but try to look at the bigger picture of brain injury recovery particularly when a patient takes on a new challenge.

It is important to ask where were the strengths? Where were the weaknesses? What positives or negatives were there to take from the experience? Were there any external factors that may have affected the patient when they took on the challenge (distractions such as loud noises, crowded places, invasion of personal space)? The list of questions and factors that need to be considered when analysing the outcome of a challenge taken on by an ABI patient in recovery is huge. It is important that you think of it as huge as well because basically what happens when we don’t properly analyse and try to understand the outcomes of challenges faced by ABI patients, we think of it in simplistic terms and downgrade the severity of the condition, its long-term manifestations and consequences.

What Are The Sociological Outcomes Of This?

If we have simplified the consequences of something as complicated, devastating and life changing as a brain injury, it is inevitable that we will then simplify the outcomes of challenges an ABI patient faces down to naïve one-word definitions (as I mentioned in my previous post) such as “success” and “failure”, does it not follow the pattern that we will react in a simplistic way? It is likely, given preceding events, that reactions will be based off of emotions, or worse, based off of the abilities of non-disabled people (the reason I say that the latter is worse is due to the fact that none of us can keep our emotions in check 100% of the time). To react in a way where we compare outcomes to challenges based on the abilities of people with a disability to non-disabled people is discriminatory, plain and simple.

What Are The Emotional Outcomes Of This (For The Patient)?

To start off with, let me say that I am very fortunate to have the parents I have. Without them I would never have got through this period of my life where my world was turned upside down. They have never expected or asked for more than I could give. We have tried things and they have not gone to plan but never once was I blamed for any mishaps that have happened along the route of recovery. Any disagreements we have had or any time I have felt hard done by is when (as I mentioned earlier, emotions cannot always be kept in check).

If I may give an example, when I am suffering especially badly from fatigue my memory, speech and thought processing are particularly affected. It takes a long time for my thoughts to find the words I want, then for my brain to send them down to my mouth and for my mouth to sound out the words. My sentences become particularly disjointed and filled with lots of “err’s” and “umm’s” between words. When relaying a phone message during our recent house move, one of my parents lost their patience with me as my brain/speech was affecting my fatigue/anxiety and meant I was not delivering the message correctly. When this happened it made me feel extremely angry and a little hurt. It was only because it was one of my parents and the stressful context the disagreement occurred in that it didn’t affect me more deeply. It has happened on other occasions and when it first happened it was extremely hurtful.

 

What Can We Take From This?

“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”

Albert Einstein

I believe that the above quote says it all. When an ABI patient takes on a challenge there will always be positives and negatives to be taken from the outcome (next week I will focus more on the positive approach methods to recovery). More importantly, there are lessons to be learned that will inform our recovery for the future. It is important to remember this and ensure that we do not allow ourselves to try and simplify a complex matter into something trivial and permit thoughts, led by emotions, confusion and a fear of change to rule our reactionary processes throughout recovery.

We, as people, are all different. The key to finding a successful route through the minefield that is ABI recovery is to be as flexible and open minded as possible and find ways to approach recovery using the tools to hand and using tools that suit the abilities, emotional state, personality and goals of the patient.

Thanks for reading. I hope you have found my post interesting or useful. Follow me here on WordPress and join the mailing list to receive the post via email every week. To stay up to date with my other goings on, follow me on Twitter (my handle is @ABIblogger) or on Instagram where my user name is abi_wordpress_massey.

 

 

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