Brain Injury Recovery – Employment

After detouring a little last week, going from specific subjects and speaking more of my method of recovery using a process of Gradual Gains, we’re back on topic this week. Don’t worry, I haven’t lost the plot (or have I?).

This is one of the more difficult issues to address after you have suffered something like a brain injury. There are so many factors that have to be taken into consideration, all of those things that came up when I was talking about “Where am I now?”. A few weeks ago and the factors I listed when I asked myself Where Do I want To Be?” All jobs require skills. Whether that is working behind the bar at a local pub and having the necessary people skills, specific technical knowledge to do a job in IT say, or whether it’s a trade job such as carpentry, all require skills and the ability to learn.

Where We Are At A Disadvantage

Now, here is the issue and it comes with the nature of brain injury and it cannot be helped. It tends to be that people who have suffered an ABI are affected in the way that they think, in their cognitive abilities, thus affecting our ability to learn new skills, commit things to memory and not to mention fight the terrible fatigue that comes with a brain injury. All of these factors direct consequences of our injuries put us at a disadvantage when it comes to applying for jobs, finding & keeping work.

In conjunction with the issues that we face every single day, we also have to face the fact that we are currently in a socio-economic situation where the job market is extremely competitive. This does mean that there are some employers who are not enthusiastic about the idea of hiring someone with the type of disability we have. What we suffer from is an invisible disability where, from the outside, apart from perhaps a few scars, we appear to be fine but people cannot possibly see or understand the problems we are forced to deal with each day, even at home let alone in the work place.

What To Consider When Thinking About Employment

There are many things that must be taken into account when it comes to jobs and the type of jobs you should apply for and whether that particular job is right for you.

  1. Know your limits! Do not over exert yourself. Consider the type of routine you have at home, what tires you out? Do you get migraines or seizures, if so; is there anything that triggers them? What skills are not as badly affected by your injury? Consider your working hours in terms of shifts. Does the job you’re applying for suit your strengths as opposed to incorporating your weaknesses?
  2. Consider whether money is essential in your current situation. Do you have rent and bills to pay? If NOT, if you are living at home and money is not as much of a problem (like me, I support myself mostly through the compensation I received after my injury) then perhaps voluntary work could be an option. Not only could you test your strength, test your limits in terms of what is manageable regarding hours and concerning the work environment, it can also be a huge confidence boost when you get out there and mix with different people; it gives you a purpose, after a brain injury I know that sometimes it can feel as though there is no purpose. If money is a necessity then there are benefits available from the state to help support employment or voluntary work if you are unable to work full-time and have no other source of income (however I would add, do not expect the government to do you any favours at this present moment in time in terms of financial support).
  3. The type of work environment you will be in if you get the job. For example, prior to my ABI almost all of my employment history had been in the service industry, either as a waiter or behind a bar. When I was ready to return to work I went back to those types of jobs. Now it turns out that, according to my neurological consultant, this is the worst, most stressful environment someone with an ABI and epilepsy could possibly work in. So it is always worth talking to a consultant or doctor prior to applying for a job or accepting a job offer.
  4. There are some larger companies that receive government grants for catering employment programs specifically for the disabled. So it is worth looking around online for this kind of employment, schemes such as these stands to benefit both parties.

What We Don’t Have To Stand For!

We do have to acknowledge that we are at a disadvantage when it comes to seeking employment. As I have mentioned, the consequences of our injury have left us less able than other people when it comes to certain things involving cognitive or physical challenges or our social skills may have been affected. I would also guess that most of the people who are reading this that have suffered an ABI suffer from fatigue in a big way. Rest periods being essential to us in terms of managing what life throws at us throughout the day.

We have to accept the limitations that have been forced on us when it comes to looking for work and take them into account when looking at job descriptions and the work environment we will be in. There are certain things we do not have to stand for though, mainly, prejudice in the work place. We should be considered just as capable and be just as valued as employees if we are given the opportunity. Here are a few things that you may want to consider doing when taking on a job. The following list is more of a guide to protecting yourself and your position while you are employed.

  1. Ensure that when you take on a job and the terms and conditions have been agreed, that you sign a contract and make sure your employer signs it as well. Please make sure that you read the contract carefully, with an advocate if necessary, to make sure that you fully understand what is going to be required of you. The contract will explain things such as codes of conduct, responsibilities, working hours, benefits, holiday and so on. These being written down will give neither you nor your employer anywhere to hide should there be a legal dispute later down the line. Finally, with the contract, ensure that you have a copy of it yourself to take home.
  2. Ensure that you are receiving at least the national minimum wage for what you are doing. You do not deserve to be paid less than anyone else, for the same job, because you suffer from a disability!
  3. When you have signed the contract for your employment, I would advise you, straight away, to join the trade union for whatever industry it is that you are working in. For a minimal fee (a few pounds a month) you can get legal advice, protection and representation should there be a dispute between you, another employee or your employer in the work place. The trade union also makes disability discrimination a key focus in their aims and targets. It is good to have them on your side rather than having to hire a lawyer at your own expense, which, for many of us is not possible for financial reasons.
  4. If you are dismissed from a job, in your opinion unfairly or that your disabilities contributed to the decision, ask for a letter of dismissal written and signed by your employer, listing the reasons for your dismissal. The next step is to then compare the letter to the contract you signed and see if there are valid reasons for dismissal, again with an advocate if necessary. If you both agree there are not, then contact your trade union.

The Key To Success In the Working World With An ABI…

I wish I could provide a magic remedy that would guarantee success for all of us. Unfortunately though, I cannot. The best advice I can give you is that you need to be ready to acknowledge the disabilities and issues we have as a result of our ABI’s and instead of resisting them, incorporate them into the job search itself, apply for positions where the limitations you have are not going to be as much of an issue.

I would also suggest opening our minds up a little. Even though it does not pay, voluntary work can do wonders for confidence and social skills. If they are issues you are struggling with, then a period of voluntary work could be hugely beneficial. If you find that it has helped you improve certain aspects of abilities that you fought with previously, it can really go a long way to improving your chances of getting a paid job. After all, is that not something we all want? Voluntary work shows a positive work ethic, a positive attitude and capability. All of those factors will go a long way towards achieving achieving our goals and gaining the financial independence we all so desperately want.

 

 

 

 

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Post-ABI – Returning To Work (Part 1)

My name is Tom; I am 26 years old and the survivor of an Acquired Brain Injury. In my previous post I mentioned the potential positive effects returning to the “mainstream” could have for people who have suffered a brain injury. This post will look at how to approach returning to mainstream employment. Last time I spoke at length on the positive effects higher education had to me and what I hope was some helpful advice on choosing the right course and accessing the support you, as a disabled student, would be entitled to. This time I hope to do the same regarding a return to work.

How Will It Help?

Returning to work can seem like a daunting prospect when you have suffered an ABI like we have. You are coming to terms with a new sense of self; there are things that you cannot do any more (perhaps cognitively, physically or both), there are issues with regards to your physical and mental health (such as fatigue, anxiety and depression). Those are issues that we face everyday (to name just a few), but I believe that a return to work can help improve most of those issues. Working a steady job, supporting ourselves and increasing our independence, grows our confidence and sense of fulfillment. This in turn plays a massive part in contributing to a positive mentality where we do not feel defined by our injury or inferior to other employees.

Looking At Yourself & Being Honest

Nobody knows you better than you. That’s a fact. It is a fact I believe to be especially important post-ABI. After a certain amount of time, you will start to become more aware of what it is you may or may not be able to do anymore. You will start to see where it is you are having difficulties. Equally, it will allow you to see where you are still strong. You may not be able to see it yet if you are still coming off the back of the injury, but you do still have strengths and abilities that make you valuable. Taking notes of these strengths and weaknesses will be crucial in terms of when you are finally ready to return to work, in applying for a suitable job for you in the long-term.

Having a positive mindset and at the same time, having a firm acceptance of your disabilities and sense of who you are key when thinking of returning to work are massive contributory factors in terms of potential success. When it gets to a point of looking for jobs, it is much better to look at the job listings asking yourself “What can I do?” as opposed to looking for what you can’t do.

Again, Start Small

I realize that this has been something of a recurring theme in many of my posts but I am a firm believer in it. When returning to work it is certainly best not to jump in with both feet. Starting out small is key to this. I believe a good way to gauge your ability to work is through voluntary employment. Offer your services to a local charity shop, or work with the head injury charities available in your area (Headway UK offer local support groups for returning to employment and there are other disability employment organisations that can help you find appropriate voluntary work, follow the link to access their website –www.headway.org.uk) . The benefits of voluntary work are that it offers a flexible working schedule and environment. This flexibility will allow you to assess yourself while you are being challenged. Again, you can look at where you are perhaps stronger or weaker; try to think of strategies that help you cope with certain situation where you struggle and how to increase your involvement in situations where you are strong. If all is going well and you would like to test your strength a little more, you can ask for more hours or more shifts while at the same time, if you are finding that the work is too demanding, you will be able to reduce hours and shifts accordingly. The positives of this is that it allows you to assess your strengths and weaknesses in the working environment in a situation of less pressure and also, if you do well, get a nice reference off the back of it.

The Support Is Out There

There are many different types of support available for people who suffered a brain injury from many different sectors. There are specific rehabilitation services, such as some of the vocational rehabilitation services that offer courses to teach new skills to those adjusting to life post-ABI. Acquiring a new skill could be just the tonic you are looking for if you are, as I was and many others are, at something of a loss as to which route you should go down. There are many vocational services offered by local branches of the NHS and accessing them should be relatively simple through your specialist.

Other potential benefits that can be gained by accessing the services of the NHS are things like appointments with occupational therapists. Getting involved in those kind of services can really help you to focus in on what it is you want to do as well as bringing potential programmes that could benefit you to your attention. I believe that just because we are the victims of a brain injury we should not be stuck in a job we hate for the rest of our lives. We should be able to gain employment that we are enthusiastic about and that gives us fulfillment (P.S. In terms of accessing the kind of support I have mentioned above – occupational therapy and vocational rehabilitation – a good place to look is in the service directory under the resources tab, on the UK Acquired Brain Injury Forum, just follow the link to their website – http://ukabif.org.uk).

There are also the Disability Employment Advisors (DEA’s) at the local Jobcentre Plus who can help you to shift through the many job opportunities out there to find something suitable for you and your specific situation. The Jobcentre Plus also offers specific programmes for disabled people who are trying to go back to work as well as information on potential welfare eligibility. Many of the Jobcentre’s effectiveness and their ability to help you will be dependent on the amount of funding they receive. I would urge you to go into it with an open mind and explore all the options that they have available (PS. Follow the link to a useful Jobcentre Plus guide – http://www.jobcentreguide.org).

In Conclusion…

It is only now I have completed this post that I have realized there is so much more I can say on this subject. So I have decided to elaborate on this subject on Monday as I think there is a lot to be said regarding the ABI in the working environment, so this one has ended up being something of a two-parter. Thanks everyone for reading and I hope it was of benefit. To find out more about my blog follow me here on WordPress @ABIBlogger or follow me on Twitter @ABIblogger (yes the lower case ‘b’ is intentional). Thanks again and be well.